Athens Gay Bars

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Athens is a large city and is the largest in Greece; it is also the capital city of Greece. In Athens there are no laws against same sex relations and therefore there is a large range of gay bars and clubs. You can expect to have a great night out in Athens with your friends.

Athens is a large city and there are a few areas which are most popular for the gay community but the majority of the bars are spread throughout the city center. Baby’s Graffiti for example is a great gay bar which is very popular with the locals. Conne is another bar which is popular and is located on Persefonis Street. This Athens gay bar is open from 11.30pm until 4am most nights and has a very mixed crowd. This is a great place to meet people and you are likely to enjoy the culture of this bar too. They play good music and also some Greek music too.

Another exciting Athens gay bar is a place called Fairy Tale which is a lesbian bar situated on Koletti Street. This is open from 10pm daily except Mondays. You can expect a mixed crowd but it’s mainly female. They have Greek music throughout the week and Live Music at weekends. You can expect a great night here with your friends. Another popular venue is a place called Kazarma and this is a great place to boogie. They have a huge dance floor and are open late expect Monday and Tuesday when they are closed.

Browse our online directory now for a complete listing of Athens gay bars!

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Hand Crank Shortwave Radio

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You need to own a hand crank short wave radio. While these shortwave radios may seem to some like novelties, they can save your life in an emergency. A shortwave radio isn’t just some AM/FM radio, it picks up a variety of shortwave radio signals. These can include but aren’t limited to weather stations, news broad casts, and even signals from other parts of the country and the world. While you may not think of these as important, in an emergency, these radios and stations can be your only link to the outside world.

A hand crank short wave radio has many different power options today. What the hand crank does is every time you turn the crank, the mechanical energy is instantly turned into electrical energy, enough to power the radio itself, and even to charge up the rechargeable batteries. Because the cranking technology has improved so much over the last few decades, turning the crank just a few minutes can power the radio continuously for more than two hours without interruption. They can also use batteries, and when there is power, plugged into the wall outlets.

The real purpose of a hand crank shortwave radio is for if you are stranded, whether on land or at sea, or if you are in the middle of some kind of natural or man made disaster. No matter what the situation, chances are there isn’t going to be any electrical power, and any kind of regular electronic device isn’t going to work. This is where the hand crank action comes into play. In many cases, evacuation procedures are going to be announced over short wave radios from emergency services. They may tell you that help is on the way, where to go, and even what to do until help arrives. In the case of flooding, storms, or tornadoes there can be more important information given on how long the storm is going to last, or how much more inclement weather is on the way. Without this vital information, you could be headed for an even more dangerous situation, or even stranded for longer, because you didn’t know where to go or what to do.

It is important that you keep a hand crank shortwave radio in many different places. You should have shortwave radios in your home, vehicle, and if you own an RV or a boat, you should have one in these as well. You just never know where an emergency will strike, and having one at home while you are stranded in the middle of nowhere doesn’t do you any good.

Just as a hand crank shortwave radio can save your life, you also have to buy the right shortwave radios as well. There are many different brands and models of these radios, and they come in a varying prices. While there many different models, not all of them are the same. The first thing you need to think about when choosing one of these radios is what your needs are. If you just want one to listen to music on the go without having to lug around a bunch of batteries, then cheaper models are a decent choice. One of these is the Eton FR 150. This radio is small and compact, and has very minimal options. Because of this, the cost is quite low.

For hand crank shortwave radio options, where you need access to multiples channels, and emergency bands, more expensive shortwave radios are a better option. This is because they have a better quality sound, and are able to pull in more channels and stations. They have better batteries, and their cranking mechanisms last far longer than cheaper models. Even so, a good radio shouldn’t cost you more than fifty to a hundred dollars.

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Enjoyable Walks in the Heart of Athens

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Getting around as a pedestrian in certain cities can be as adrenaline-filled as cliff-diving. Dodging cars should simply not have to be a worry on holiday when relaxation and fun tend to take priority. In the lovely bustling  city  of  Athens , a welcome refuge from such unpleasant stress can be found on the Grand Promenade in  Athens . Closed to automobiles only a few short years ago, this pedestrian haven is filled to the brim with some of the best historical sites  Athens  has to offer. On this elegant pedestrian route, you will encounter marble temples, neoclassical museums, and ancient theatres. Of course, all the while you will be casually circling the Acropolis.

A great starting point is the Temple of Olympian Zeus located next to the National Gardens. This colossal temple took centuries to build. Completed in no less than 700 years by Hadrian in 131 A.D., it maintained its complete structure until a rogue storm in the 19th-century took out some of the columns.

On the southern side of the Acropolis, you will find the Theatre of Dionysus. This is the theatre that welcomed the dramatic arts as they are known today in existence in 543 B.C. It also served as the first forum for the plays of Sophocles, Aristophanes and Euripides in their day. The nearby Roman Herodes Atticus amphitheatre is closed to visitors except during the summer  Athens  festival when attendees can view its form and structure up close. If you decide to follow the marble walkway up to Filopappou and Hill of the Muses, you will be rewarded with spectacular views of the Parthenon and the Athenian skyline. From this promontory, you will be able to see as far as the Saronic Sea. With views like this, your camera may run out of memory space before you manage to pull yourself away and on to your next destination.

After such a hike, you may need a breather and possibly some refreshments. For that, your best bet is Apostolou Pavlou where you can sip espresso or perhaps some ouzo at a lively bouzouki club or quaint outdoor cafe and even take in a film at the Thission cinema. For a slow return into modernity, you can also check out the multimedia exhibits at the Centre of Traditional Pottery and the recently minted New Acropolis Museum. With this much culture and history to experience, the question isn’t what to do but, how to fit everything into one trip!

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Teenager Travels Through Time With Hunky King Tut in New YA Novel

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Fifteen-year-old Rosa is one of those rare people gifted with the ability to hear the dead speaking to her. Usually, however, the dead are pesky people who want to talk to her while she’s busy doing things like taking math tests; in one such instance, when she tries to get rid of the dead person so she can concentrate, she finds herself in a shouting match and is soon after sent to the principal’s office.

Of course, no one believes Rosa can really speak to the dead, so her life isn’t easy, but it’s about to get a lot more interesting. Rosa is already obsessed with Ancient Egypt, but she can hardly believe it when King Tut not only starts speaking to her, but he appears before her eyes. Once she gets past noticing what a hunk he is, she realizes he’s trying to enlist her on a time travel mission that not only seems impossible but downright dangerous.

Hunk or not, Tut has his heart set on his ancient love, his wife, Ankhesenpaaten. They have been separated for centuries, but now she is trying to communicate with Tut through Rosa, and Tut needs Rosa’s help to lead him to his love’s final resting place.

Time travel does indeed happen, and before Rosa knows it, she’s witnessing Tut’s life story as well as facing the fierce General Horemheb, who succeeded Tut’s family as pharaoh and wants to wipe out all traces of Tut’s family history in Ancient Egypt. Before the story is over, Rosa will find herself channeling the dead, being locked up in a tomb, and discovering that all the gold in King Tut’s tomb is of little value compared to true love.

Cheryl Carpinello’s new novel Sons of the Sphinx is a riveting madcap ride through a fascinating time in Ancient Egypt’s history. Readers meet not only King Tut but his controversial father, King Akenhaten, and his famous stepmother, Queen Nefertiti. Insights are given into ancient life, and Egyptian mythology is explored. Best of all, the story is both fun and educational, which led to its designation as a “Literary Classics Award Winning Book.” The book also has a glossary in the back of Egyptian gods, people, places, and terms.

Cheryl Carpinello, as a longtime educator and the author of several other young adult books, including Guinevere: On the Eve of Legend and The King’s Ransom, knows how to entertain young readers in a way that makes them want to learn more. And as an adult reader, I learned a lot about King Tut and his time that I didn’t know, and I now want to learn more, so if I feel that enthusiastic about this book, I can just imagine how excited I would have been as a child reading this book. I’m certain it’s destined to be a favorite among young readers.

A companion volume to the book, titled Tutankhamen Speaks, is also available; it tells King Tut’s full life story in his own words.

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The Slow Motion Game

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Recently, a friend invited me to stop and slow down. Just for a few minutes.

I slipped off my shoes and felt the cool stepping stones in her garden under my feet. In a few short minutes, with all systems slowed to the moment in front of me, I felt like Alice in Wonderland-one moment staring up at the giant, waving leaf of a tropical banana tree and the next moment bent down, in awe at the mini, star-shaped moss tuft peeking out between a crack in the stones.

Ten minutes later, as I finished up this walking meditation in her garden, refreshed and ready to go about with my busy day, I knew it was something I wanted to remember to continue as a regular practice for myself and share with my favorite seven year old.

“Hey,” I said to the curly haired boy, “Wanna play The Slow Motion Game with me?”

“What’s that?” he responded, with the keen skepticism of a seven year old who has been around the block and played a zillion games or two in his lifetime so far.

“Well, it’s a kind of discovery game. We slow dooooown.” I started talking in slow motion speak. “And when we look aroooound we see things that we’ve neeeeeverrr seeeeeen beforrrrrrre.”

I could see the spark of interest lit in his eyes now.

“And whoever finds the most cool stuff is the winner?” he yelled excitedly.

“Sure, something like that.”

Five… Close your eyes

Four… Slowing down

Three… Your mind is going to sleep

Two… Your body is getting very relaxed

One… You are in slow motion mode. Open your eyes… And GO… s l o w w w w w w w w…

Our bare feet made their way slowly through the back yard. The dirt felt good sinking between my toes. I watched out of the corner of my eye as the boy did his best slow mummy walk and then presently crouched down.

Between the two of us, we discovered treasures galore in our familiar backyard space.

An army of ants coming out of tiny hole in the flower bed, a bright green arrowhead-shaped sprout shooting out ninety degrees from a tree branch, a baby fly sunning its translucent wings, a baby bee buzzing. We discovered the glossy, tightly curled leaf of a waxy flower pushing its way upward, and crystalline water drops sitting in the very center of a regal succulent. A family of pincher bugs scurried away as we studied the natural, hieroglyphic markings on an old tree stump.

Long after we finished playing, the curly haired boy was still bent over, looking at potato bugs curled up in tree hollows or looking up through tree branches, discovering many more unseen treasures in the garden.

I didn’t mention to the wild-haired one the part that we would feel ourselves coming back to ourselves during this game.

I didn’t mention that by slowing down our spinning minds, we would enliven all our other senses, as we became part of the world in front of us.

I didn’t mention that by slowing down, we recharge and reconnect with that vital source within us.

I didn’t mention that part to him. I didn’t have to.

Yes, this was a good game.

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Central Hotel Athens – Cheap Deals and Discounts

A central hotel in Athens is an individual property, designed for the perceptive traveler. Being a landmark in Greek hospitality, St. George Lycabettus Hotel is located at the heart of Kolonaki. Kolonaki being the most upscale neighborhood in central Athens is just minutes away from the Acropolis and the cosmopolitan city-center.

The hotel is owned by the same family since their opening. They have remained focus in providing modern and fresh hospitality to both business and leisure travelers.

Breathtaking views of the Acropolis, from the rooftop restaurant to the south-facing balconies will surely be experienced on this central Athens hotel. The Modern Greek, Byzantine and Victorian art displays, highlights your interest throughout the hotel. The inspiring views of the Acropolis and picturesque church of St. George, from where its name came from, are visible throughout the hotel.

Providing you with unforgettable experiences while in Athens are the main goal of the hotel’s guest relations department. They are at your service daily. Restaurant recommendations, fun recreational ideas, opera tickets, limousine transfer arrangements are just a few samples of the many services they can offer. For more information, please contact Tel: (+30) 210 7290711-19 or fax: (+30) 210 7290439

The Athenian Callirhoe Hotel

In the heart of Athens City, along Kallirrois Avenue, lies Athenian Callirhoe Hotel. This central hotel in Athens is where you can find the finest accommodation that goes hand in hand with a delightful culinary experience.

Discovering a distinctive building with well-designed urban interiors, you are about to experience the very best in luxury and service. The hotel’s location is just a short walk from all of Athens City’s cultural attractions. Since it is minutes away from the commercial center and Acropolis Museum, this makes it perfect for business and leisure travelers. It is only a 35-minute drive to and from the Athens International Airport. It is also a mere 9km away from the Port of Piraeus. This makes this hotel very convenient to guests.

This central hotel in Athens provides “upon request” services like baby-sitting, limousine services, massage aromatherapy, Air & Sea Transportation private services and many more.

For reservations, feel free to reach them at Tel. +30 – 210-9215353, Fax: +30 – 210-9215342.

Hotel Marina

Marina Hotel is within walking distances from the main attractions in the City of Athens. Being at the heart of the city, it is just 20km away from the airport, 7km from the port of Pireaus and 150m from the Omonia subway station.

This central hotel in Athens has 81 rooms that are all equipped with air-conditioning, direct dial phone lines, satellite televisions and a mini bar. In respect to the art and tradition of Ancient Athens, the Marina was recently renovated.

Near this central hotel in Athens, you can visit the most fascinating attraction in all of Athens itself – the Parthenon. It is the temple of the Greek goddess Athena. Another site to visit is the Pnyx Hill in Central Athens. It is situated less than a kilometer from the west side of the Acropolis.

For a chance to get a glimpse of the finest attractions in the capital and largest city of Greece; make your reservations by calling their office at Tel: +30 210 5237832-3 +30 210 5225641. You can also fax them at +30 210 5229109.

High Heels – Your Best Friend

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Have you ever saw an American movie called “In Her Shoes”?

Rose and Maggie (performed by Cameron Diaz) are sisters who claim to have nothing in common but DNA, a tragic childhood, and a shared shoe size. Rose owns an attorney position, a conservative personality, and a secret passion for romance. She is sophisticated with work but timid to her plain figure and appearance. Therefore, Rose stores a full wardrobe of high heels without enough courage to wear them out and show them off. Maggie, the little one who is absolutely reverse version of her sister, features drop-dead gorgeous, loafer, flirtation, and troublemaker. She left home without farewell after being caught at the scene when she was carrying on a clandestine love affair with Rose’s boyfriend. In terms of women, the climax comes as Rose gives up her admirable job to then bravely wears the high heels she likes to hide into wardrobe. She successfully goes through a change of outlook on her relationship with Maggie-her   unique  sister, the man she has wrongly loved and the man she should love and treasure at present. Everything can start from “head”, as well as “foot”, not just curing the sequela of losing love.

“When I feel bad, I like to treat myself. Clothes never look any good. Foods just make me fatter. Shoes always fit.” The lines, from Rose, reveal her secret: she is not the prude that she looks like in appearance, but a lovely girl who is keenly obsessed with various high heels as well. Numberless pairs of housed high heels are her bosom friend, listening to her success, happiness sharing her upset and cheering her up when she is in low spirit. Even though Rose just buy them then hide them without debut with them, she still be companied and placated by their sweetness and attention.

Men may leave and love may be pulled away, but high heels will always stay.

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One M&T Plaza

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Many talk extensively about New York and how it has evolved to be the most commercialized metropolis in the United States. The State of New York includes Buffalo, the silent sibling who has contributed to the state’s growth in an almost invisible way. Among the many things in Buffalo that attract tourists to get a glimpse of a more laid-back atmosphere in cacophonic New York, the One M&T Plaza stands tall in the city center. It’s not an exceptionally tall building, nor is it an architectural marvel. But then, why is it so popular among the many who visit Buffalo?

Standing just 317 feet tall and housing 21 floors, the One M&T Plaza was built in 1966 and is the current home to the M&T bank’s corporate headquarters. The building was designed by Minoru Yamasaki & Associates, the same people who designed the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York City. This is probably one reason for its immense popularity. During holidays, the building’s top band is illuminated, creating a very celebratory mood around the place. On normal days, this band is simply illuminated in white. Hockey season sees the building colored in blue and gold, cheering on the Buffalo Sabers.

The land space used to build the One M&T Plaza was the highest real estate transaction ever made during that time in Buffalo. Its construction required an entire city block to be demolished. The One M&T Plaza has a promenade facing the Main Street and hosts various lunchtime concerts in summer. A farmer’s market can be found between the plaza and Lafayette Square, mostly during late spring, summer and early autumn. The One M&T Plaza is located nearby to everything in central Buffalo.

If you are in Buffalo for business, you’d most likely to have to pay a visit to the One M&T Plaza’s promenade for a business lunch. Whether you are traveling for leisure or business, choose a Buffalo hotel with a good reputation to avoid hassles. Try the Millennium Airport Hotel Buffalo for a difference, as they offer modern amenities,excellent services and very cozy accommodations for all their guests.

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Summer Infant Best View Color Video Baby Monitor Review

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The Summer Infant Best View color video baby monitor is one of the highest rated video monitors you can buy to help you keep an eye on your child. It is loaded with features that put it a cut above the rest. The camera pans and zooms, the 2.5″ screen size is easy to see, and it provides reliable performance.

The digital technology used in this monitor ensures that the image of your baby won’t be transmitted beyond your home. With night vision technology, you can see your baby even in the dark and the one-touch on/off button lets you take a quick look for reassurance at any time.

Summer Infant Best View Product Description

The 100% digital system allows complete privacy without having to search for a clear channel. The camera can be wall mounted and remotely controlled to zoom in, pan, or scan the room. The digital menu is controlled by a toggle switch found on the 2.4Ghz parents unit. The clear picture is transmitted either in full color when the lights are on, or in black & white night vision with the use of LED lights to provide a look at your baby in the dark.

The digital picture on the 2.5″ LCD screen of the parents unit has a range of 350′ from the nursery unit and transmits privately and securely.

Summer Infant Best View Features

  • One 2.5ghz parents unit
  • 2.5″ LCD color screen
  • Belt clip
  • One touch on/off button for reduced battery drain
  • Toggle switch to navigate menus for changing camera angle, camera settings and volume control
  • Rechargeable battery and A/C adapter
  • Battery and signal strength
  • Automatic shut off of the video screen preventing unnecessary drain on the batteries
  • Parent unit stand
  • Light and sound indicators
  • Full color camera with black and white night vision
  • Camera pan, scan and zoom
  • Microphone

Summer Infant Best View Review

This monitor offers the security of a 100% digital transmission, meaning the image of your baby won’t be visible to others who might use the same channel. The 2.5″ LCD screen is a great size for viewing your baby in the handheld parent unit. Night vision makes it easy to check in on your child and the on/off button means you can look and then let the screen turn back off to avoid disturbing your own sleep in the middle of the night with constant light from the screen.

The panning, scanning and zooming features of the camera make it easy to keep track of baby, even with a lot of movement. Extra cameras can also be added to the unit and set up in different rooms or at different angles.

Wireless home networks might interfere with the performance of this monitor. While additional cameras can be added, additional parent units are not available. The addition of a complete set can provide an extra parent unit attached to a different camera for dual parent coverage.

The Best View monitor is rated as having a very clear picture with little to no static, and the 2.5″ LCD is large enough to see well. Most users have been very pleased with the performance of the unit.

The Summer Infant Best View Handheld Color Video Monitor has all of the features a parent could ask for in a unit of this type. It gives a great view of the baby from all angles with the remote controlled panning and zooming features and the night vision lets you see your baby at night. If you are looking for a clear, color view of your baby, this monitor fits the bill.

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The Political Polarity That Was Athens and Sparta

Around 800 B.C.E. the Greek populous started to coalesce into communities which were called poleis. The polis was a city state with its own governing body and typically a military. Each polis varied considerably from other poleis. A polis could have anywhere from one thousand to tens of thousands of citizens between its main urban center, and its surrounding towns and agricultural developments. The poleis of Sparta and Athens were two of the largest and most powerful city states in ancient Greece. These two poleis were also among the most competitive, mostly with each other, and influential in the ancient Greek world.

Athens was a largely agriculturally based polis in Attica, off of the Aegean Sea. It was dependent on slaves to do the manual labor of the polis, from working the fields, to working in the homes of Athenian citizens. Athens was a democratic city state whose society revolved around politics, as it was the primary day to day activity of the male citizens. Athens hosted a powerful navy which was influential on more than one occasion for fighting off Persian invasions.

Sparta is in most ways the opposite of Athens. Sparta is also heavily dependent on slaves, or ‘helots’ as they are called. Helots primarily work the land which was conquered by Sparta for agricultural production. Sparta is a highly militaristic polis, having its entire society based around warfare. For more of the antiquity of Greece than any other polis, Sparta maintained the definitive hoplite infantry force in Greece.

The attitude of both of these great poleis was vastly different. Athens was the sophisticated, innovative, and cultured democratic polis. Sparta was completely militaristic. It was traditional, simple, and straight forward. At birth newborns in Sparta were judged as being big and strong enough to become a Spartiate warrior, or a child was judged incapable, and it was left in the mountains to die. At age seven children were taken into state-run educational systems where men were trained for war. Athens young men were largely dedicated to battle, not to the degree of Sparta, but there was a large factor making up for this fact.

Pericles, an Athenian Strategos, had urged the married women of Athens to bear more children. Athens population was much greater than Spartas to begin with, and had a much larger birth rate. Spartiates were to get married between age twenty and thirty, but until age thirty, they were to remain living in the barracks. “Men living in the barracks were only permitted to meet their wives surreptitiously-a fact that may account in part for the notably low birthrate among Spartiate couples.” To compete with Athens, Sparta’s’ militarism was necessary to keep up, but they did even manage to surpass the Athenians land forces.

Both poleis had forms of government to match their respective differing attitudes which further high lights the polarism of these two city states. Spartan government is made up of two kings, of equal power, each with their own royal family and line of succession. Under them is a council of twenty-eight elders, who put issues forward for a strictly ‘yes’, or ‘no’ vote, with no discussion, by an assembly made of all Spartiate warriors over thirty. There was also five ephors, who were elected officials with the task of supervising the educational system, and to protect the traditions of Sparta. The ephors had the power to remove a king from command if necessary. If anything, the Spartan government, and society overall was primarily static, and compared to such a polis as Athens who was a quickly changing and open cosmopolitan city state, Sparta could be called stubborn.

Athens’s form of government changed from time to time, but primarily Athens was ruled by nine Archons who exercised executive power in Athens. They had one year terms, and once their term was over they were lifetime members of the Areopagus Council. The council had a large influence on the judicial matters of Athens. This council was the party responsible for electing the Archons. The political atmosphere in Athens did change considerably, because of its open and democratic nature, and more than one politician caused political reform. Politics and discussion went hand in hand. Athens also hosted some of the most well known philosophers in history, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, which were all very political thinkers.

Athens and Sparta were two fundamentally different city states functioning In the same ‘country’, which at times could have been said to not have been big enough for the two of them. With each polis striving to expand outside of Greece, as well as each trying to control the various smaller and less powerful poleis of Greece they were fierce competitors. This elicited more than one armed conflict, including the twenty-seven year long Peloponnesian war. Though on a few occasions Athens, Sparta, and various other unfriendly poleis banded together to fight invading Persians, the two poleis were both too fundamentally different, competitive, and patriotic to allow any strong unity between them beyond peace and trade treaties. They both existed as communities adapted to survive independently from other city states, and when their interests merged either it was to protect Greece itself from foreign powers, or it meant conflict as they fought over resources and other goals.